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What is a Query?

By Christopher Wehner

Question: What is a query? I have treatments -- is that the same thing?

Author Christopher Wehner responds: A query is a communication between a screenwriter and any industry professional, including agents, producers or executives. It can take place as an e-mail, letter, fax or even a phone call. A query is your first contact with an industry professional. Traditionally, the term is used in reference to a written query letter (inquiry).

Your written query letter accomplishes one of two things: 1) it inquires about the possibility to submit your script, or 2) it persuades someone to request your script.

A typical query letter consists of four things: Title of script, genre, your pitch and any important qualifications and/or experience. A query letter should never be more than a few paragraphs (one page). Presentation should be professional. It should be written as cleanly and tightly as possible, keep in mind that a query letter is a sample of your writing abilities. If you cannot communicate your story effectively, the chances your script will be requested are next to none.

Meet the Author: Christopher Wehner